Panel Borders and other podcasts

Panel Borders and other podcasts

Podcasts, radio shows, writing and more by Alex Fitch

You can scroll the shelf using and keys

Today’s show: Guardian Lit

July 7, 2014

Today at 4.30pm on Resonance 104.4 FM, Panel Borders: Guardian Lit

Excerpts from The House that Groaned by Karrie Fransman, Tristram Shandy by Martin Rowson, and Dead Boy Detectives by Toby Litt and Mark Buckingham

Excerpts from The House that Groaned by Karrie Fransman, Tristram Shandy by Martin Rowson, and Dead Boy Detectives by Toby Litt and Mark Buckingham

Starting a month of shows looking at the connections between comic books and literature, Alex Fitch talks to Guardian cartoonsists Karrie Fransman and Martin Rowson, and novelist Toby Litt about their processes of comic book creation. Fransman discusses how she broke into the industry before starting Observer Graphic Novel of the Month, The House that Groaned; Rowson looks at how political cartooning lead to his adaptations of literary classics such as Tristram Shandy, and Litt talks about how his career as a novelist helped him write DC Comics’ new serialised comic book Dead Boy Detectives. Recorded in front of an audience at Guardian Masterclass, January 2014.

4.30pm, Monday 7th July, repeated 11am, Thursday 10th July 2014, Resonance 104.4 FM (London) / streamed at www.resonancefm.com / podcast after broadcast at www.panelborders.wordpress.com (more…)

Panel Borders: Updating the classics

February 25, 2013 2 Comments

Interior art and cover of Gulliver's Travels by Martin Rowson, cover of Vicious Circle and interior art from The Unwritten, written by Mike Carey

Interior art and cover of Gulliver’s Travels by Martin Rowson, cover of Vicious Circle and interior art from The Unwritten, written by Mike Carey

Updating the classics: Concluding our month of shows looking at the connections between comics and literature, Alex Fitch talks to a pair of authors who have used graphic novels and comics to update classic literature. Mike Carey discusses his comic The Unwritten which sees characters from classic literature – such as Frankenstein‘s monster – and authors – like Mark Twain – being caught up in a fantastical conspiracy through the ages; Alex and Mike also discuss how the latter’s parallel career as a novelist effects his comic book writing.
Also, newspaper cartoonist Martin Rowson discusses his graphic novel adaptation and updating of Gulliver’s Travels, with its art and content reflecting current political leaders and situations. (Originally broadcast 24/02/13 on Resonance 104.4 FM)

For more info and a variety of different formats you can stream or download, please visit the home of this podcast at www.archive.org (more…)

Today’s show: Updating the classics

February 24, 2013

Tonight at 6pm on Resonance 104.4 FM, Panel Borders: Adapting the classics

Interior art and cover of Gulliver's Travels by Martin Rowson, cover of Vicious Circle and interior art from The Unwritten, written by Mike Carey

Interior art and cover of Gulliver’s Travels by Martin Rowson, cover of Vicious Circle and interior art from The Unwritten, written by Mike Carey

Concluding our month of shows looking at the connections between comics and literature, Alex Fitch talks to a pair of authors who have used graphic novels and comics to update classic literature. Mike Carey discusses his comic The Unwritten which sees characters from classic literature – such as Frankenstein‘s monster – and authors – like Mark Twain – being caught up in a fantastical conspiracy through the ages; Alex and Mike also discuss how the latter’s parallel career as a novelist effects his comic book writing.
Also, newspaper cartoonist Martin Rowson discusses his graphic novel adaptation and updating of Gulliver’s Travels, with its art and content reflecting current political leaders and situations.
6pm, Sunday 24th February 2013, repeated 4.30pm, Tuesday 26th February, Resonance 104.4 FM (London) / streamed at www.resonancefm.com / podcast at www.panelborders.wordpress.com (more…)

Panel Borders: Martin Rowson and Tristram Shandy

June 11, 2010 13 Comments

Panel Borders:

Martin Rowson and Tristram Shandy

Originally broadcast 09/06/10 as part of a Clear Spot on Resonance 104.4 FM

Images from Tristram Shandy and The Guardian newspaper by Martin Rowson

Images from Tristram Shandy and The Guardian newspaper by Martin Rowson

In the first of a trio of shows about and inspired by the Tate Britain exhibition ‘Rude Britannia’, Alex Fitch talks to newspaper cartoonist Martin Rowson about his rereleased graphic adaptation of the humorous and experimental Eighteenth century novel The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman by Lawrence Sterne. Alex and Martin also talk about the latter’s interest in the history of cartooning from William Hogarth to George Herriman, the artist’s experiences in using different drawing media and his ways of overcoming boredom!

For more info about this podcast and a variety of formats you can stream or download, please visit the home of this episode at www.archive.org

Links: Guardian archive of Martin Rowson’s cartoons
Info about Tristram Shandy at publisher Self Made Hero’s website
Rude Britannia microsite

Recommended events:

MARTIN ROWSON: CREATIONS IN BAD FAITH, DRAWINGS FOR NEW HUMANIST MAGAZINE

Since 2002 satirical cartoonist Martin Rowson has been drawing exclusive covers and illustrations for New Humanist magazine. Rowson’s acid nib has provided the perfect visual accompaniment to New Humanist’s cheeky godlessness. Show features more than 50 pieces from a unique collaboration truly made in hell.

8 Jun to 12 Jun

Menier Gallery , 51 Southwark Street, London SE1 1RU

COMICS AND MEDICINE: Medical Narrative in Graphic Novels

Confirmed keynote lectures by Paul Gravett, Brian Fies and Marc Zaffran

This one-day interdisciplinary conference aims to explore medical narrative in graphic novels and comics. Although the first comic book was invented in 1837 the long-format graphic narrative has only become a distinct and unique body of literary work relatively recently. Thanks in part to the growing Medical Humanities movement, many medical schools now encourage the reading of literature and the study of art to gain insights into the human condition. A serious content for comics is not new but representation of illness in graphic novels is an increasing trend. The melding of text and visuals in graphic fiction and non-fiction has much to offer medical professionals, students and, indeed, patients. Among the growing number of graphic novels, a sub-genre exploring the patients’ and the carers’ experiences of illness or disability has emerged.

Presentations will examine the development and trends evident in medically themed graphic fiction and manga, the relative strengths of the medium and the motivation behind its creation, whether by healthcare professionals, service users or carers. The use of ‘comics’ in medical and public education, and their role in health communication and scholarship will also be discussed.

17 June 2010

Institute of English Studies,
School of Advanced Study, University of London